Who Funded Statewide Ballot Campaigns?

NOTE: This information is based on campaign finance disclosures filed with the Michigan Secretary of State. The Michigan Campaign Finance Network compiled the data.

The page lists 2017-2018 statewide ballot proposal campaigns and opposition campaigns. The page includes ballot committees that have reported raising more than $100,000 and have taken a stance on a proposal that could be on the ballot in 2018.

Full campaign finance disclosures from the ballot proposal committees are available here.

 

— Citizens Protecting Michigan’s Constitution
— Clean Energy, Healthy Michigan
— Clean MI
— Coalition To Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol
Healthy and Productive Michigan
— MI Time To Care
— Michigan One Fair Wage
— Michigan Opportunity
— Promote The Vote
— Protect Michigan Jobs
— Protect My Vote
— Protecting Michigan Taxpayers
— Small Business For A Better Michigan
— Voters Not Politicians

 

 


Proposal Campaigns That Made The Ballot

 

 

 

Coalition To Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol (Pro-Marijuana Legalization)

Campaign disclosures cover: Through Nov. 26, 2018

What it is: This was a proposal campaign to initiate a state law to legalize marijuana in Michigan. The proposal would allow for the personal possession of marijuana by individuals who are older than 21 and set up new state guidelines for the industry. The ballot proposal passed with 55.8 percent of the vote.

How much has it raised: $3.73 million ($1.91 million direct contributions and $1.81 million in in-kind contributions)

How much has it spent: $1.90 million

How many individual contributions has it reported: about 1,082 contributors

Top contributors:

1. New Approach PAC, Washington, D.C., $1.78 million
2. Marijuana Policy Project, Washington D.C, $554,205
3. Smokers Outlet, Troy, $250,000
4. Marijuana Policy Project Foundation, Washington D.C, $188,807
5. MI Legalize 2018, East Lansing, $170,000
6. Drug Policy Action, New York, $100,000
7. Kevin McCaffery, RBK Enterprises, Ann Arbor, $95,000
8. Sam Usman Jr., UPM LLC, East Lansing, $50,000
9. KX3 Superwall LLC, Royal Oak, $50,000
10. DKT Liberty, Washington D.C, $50,000
11. Susan Ruiz, scientist, Massachusetts, $50,000
12. Rick Steves, writer/TV Host, $50,000

 

 

 

 

Healthy and Productive Michigan (Anti-Marijuana Legalization)

Campaign disclosures cover: Through Nov. 26, 2018

What It Is: This was a campaign to oppose the effort to legalize marijuana in Michigan. The ballot proposal to legalize marijuana passed with 55.8 percent of the vote.

How much has it raised: $2.61 million ($2.40 million direct contributions and $215,118 in-kind contributions)

How much has it spent: $2.39 million

How many individual contributions has it reported: about 186 contributions

Top contributors:

1. Smart Approaches to Marijuana Action, Virginia, $1.65 million
2. Michigan Energy First, Okemos, $250,000
3. Dow Chemical, $100,000
4. J.C. Huizenga, Huizenga Group, $51,000
5. Mark Murray, Meijer, $50,000
6. Business Leaders for Michigan, $50,000
7. ITC Holdings Corp, $50,000
9. Richard Haworth, retired, $50,000
10. Haworth Inc. $50,000
11. Gordon Food Service, $50,000
12. Lear Corporation, $50,000
13. Gerard Anderson, DTE Energy, $50,000

 

 

 

 

 



 

Voters Not Politicians (Pro-Redistricting Reform)

Campaign disclosures cover: Through Nov. 26, 2018

What it is: This was a ballot proposal campaign to amend the Michigan Constitution to reform the state's process for drawing legislative district lines. The proposal would take the power to draw district lines from lawmakers and give it an independent commission. The proposal passed with 61.2 percent of the vote.

How much has it raised: $16.41 million ($16.06 million direct contributions and $351,106 in in-kind contributions)

How much has it spent: $15.51 million

How many individual contributions has it reported: about 30,963 contributions

Top contributors:

1. Sixteen Thirty Fund, Washington D.C., $6.0 million
2. Action Now Initiative, Texas, $5.12 million
3. SEIU-United Healthcare Workers, $500,000
4. Kathryn Murdoch, Quadrivium Foundation, $500,000
5. Stacy Schusterman, Samson Energy, $500,000
6. The Baupost Group LLC, Boston, $250,000
7. National Redistricting Action Fund, $250,000
8. Beckwith Constitutional Liberties Fund, East Lansing nonprofit, $150,000
9. National Education Association, $125,000
10. Green Advocacy Project, $100,000
11. Jonathan Soros, JS Capital Management, $100,000
12. Open Society Policy Center, $100,000

 

 

 

Protect My Vote (Anti-Redistricting Reform Proposal)

Campaign disclosures cover: Through Nov. 26, 2018

What it is: This was a ballot proposal campaign that worked to oppose Voters Not Politicians. The group formed on Aug. 23, 2018, and aired TV ads against the proposal. The ballot proposal to institute an independent redistricting commission passed with 61.8 percent of the vote.

How much has it raised: $3.36 million ($3.23 in direct contributions and $124,830 in in-kind contributions)

How much has it spent: $3.21 million

How many individual contributions has it reported: about 39 contributions

Top contributors:

1. Michigan Freedom Fund, $3.05 million
2. Michigan Republican Party, $130,000
3. Michigan Chamber PAC II, $100,000
4. Business Leaders for Michigan, $50,000
5. Michigan Farm Bureau, $10,000
6. Mike Cox, attorney, $6,000
7. Alan Kloha, Circle K Service, $221

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Citizens Protecting Michigan's Constitution (Anti-Redistricting Reform Proposal)

Campaign disclosures cover: Through Dec. 31, 2018

What it is: This was a ballot committee that opposed the Voters Not Politicians proposal. It also ran social media ads opposing the campaign for a part-time Legislature. This committee has worked on other issues in the past and could work on other proposals in the future. The committee dissolved in January 2019.

How much has it raised: $393,180 ($305,000 in direct contributions and $88,180 in in-kind contributions)

How much has it spent: $304,392

How many individual contributions has it reported: 11 contributions

Top contributors:

1. Michigan Chamber PAC II, $136,260
(This is a ballot proposal committee connected to the Michigan Chamber of Commerce. Its top financial donors in 2017-2018 have been Enbridge Energy, which gave $125,000, the Michigan Realtors, which gave $10,000, and Jackson National Life, which gave $10,000)
2. John Kennedy, Autocam Corp., $100,000
3. Michigan Chamber Litigation (in-kind legal fees), $85,000
4. Fair Lines America Inc., Virginia, $50,000
5. Realtors PAC of Michigan II, $20,000
6. LaBrant Strategies, Perry (in-kind services), $1,550
7. Michigan Chamber of Commerce, $370

 

 

 



 

 

Promote The Vote (No-Reason Absentee Voting And Other Election Law Changes)

Campaign disclosures cover: Through Nov. 26, 2018

What it is: This was a campaign to amend the Michigan Constitution to make a series of election reforms. The campaign would allow for no-reason absentee voting and would allow for people to be automatically registered to vote when obtaining a license from the Secretary of State. It would also provide for the right to vote a secret ballot and to have election results audited. The proposal passed with 66.9 percent of the vote.

How much has it raised: $5.31 million ($4.68 million direct contributions and $629,185 in-kind contributions)

How much has it spent: $4.58 million

How many individual contributions has it reported: about 8,779 contributions

Top contributors:

1. American Civil Liberties Union, New York, $2.59 million
2. Michigan League Of Conservation Voters, $800,000
3. Stacy Schusterman, Samson Energy Company, $500,00
4. American Civil Liberties Union of Michigan, $348,351
5. Sixteen Thirty Fund, $250,000
6. United Auto Workers, $150,000
7. Campaign for Democracy, California, $100,000
8. Steven Laufer, Federal Reserve, $100,000
9. Rachel Bendit, Ann Arbor, $51,400
10. National Education Association, $50,000
11. American Federation of Teachers, $50,000

 

 

 




 

2017-2018 Proposal Campaigns That Didn't Make The Ballot

 

 

 

Michigan One Fair Wage (Pro-Minimum Wage Increase)

Campaign disclosures cover: Through Oct. 20, 2018

What it is: This was a proposal campaign to initiate legislation to increase Michigan's minimum wage. Under the proposal, the minimum wage would increase to $12 an hour in 2022. Michigan's current minimum wage is $8.90 an hour. The Legislature approved this proposal and later amended the language to weaken the proposal's provisions.

How much has it raised: $1.61 million ($1.51 million direct contributions and $98,646 in-kind contributions)

How much has it spent: $1.42 million

How many individual contributions has it reported: 178 contributions

Top contributors:

1. Restaurant Opportunities Center Action,$687,472
2. Raise Michigan, another proposal campaign, Royal Oak, $297,648
3. Restaurant Opportunities Center United, New York, $200,000
4. Restaurant Opportunities Center, Detroit, $132,775
5. United Auto Workers V CAP, $100,000
6. Economic Justice Alliance of Michigan, $75,000
7. Jane Fonda, Georgia, $50,000
8. Goodman Acker, Southfield, $4,200 (legal services)
9. Sachs Waldman, Detroit, $4,098 (legal services)

 

 

 

 

Michigan Opportunity (Anti-Minimum Wage Increase Proposal)

Campaign disclosures cover: Through Nov. 26, 2018

What it is: This was a ballot proposal campaign that worked against the proposal to increase the minimum wage in 2018. The Legislature approved the proposal and later amended the language to weaken the proposal's provisions.

How much has it raised: $361,105 ($331,150 direct contributions and $29,955 in-kind contributions)

How much has it spent: $151,604

How many individual contributions has it reported: about 24 contributions

Top contributors:

1. Michigan Restaurant Association, $130,055
2. National Restaurant Association, Washington D.C., $75,000
3. Restaurant Advocacy Fund, Washington D.C, $25,000
4. Boyne Resorts, Harbor Springs, $20,000
5. Dine Brands, California, $20,000
6. Team Schostak Family, Livonia, $20,000
7. Sysco Corporation, Texas, $15,000
8. Ansara Corporation, Farmington, $10,000
9. Heirloom Hospitality, Birmingham, $10,000
10. J K & T Wings Inc, Shelby Township, $10,000

 

 

 


 

 

 

MI Time To Care (Pro-Earned Sick Leave)

Campaign disclosures cover: Through Oct. 26, 2018

What it is: This was a proposal campaign to initiate legislation to establish a right for employees to earn sick leave for personal or family health needs. The Legislature approved the proposal and later amended the language to weaken the proposal's provisions.

How much has it raised: $2.75 million ($2.53  million direct contributions and $220,370 in-kind contributions)

How much has it spent: $2.53 million

How many individual contributions has it reported: 58 contributions

Top contributors:

1. Sixteen Thirty Fund, Washington D.C., $2.12 million
2. The Fairness Project, Washington D.C., $311,990
3. Raise Michigan, another proposal campaign, Royal Oak, $80,400
4. United Way For Southeast Michigan, $70,550
5. Economic Justice Alliance of Michigan, Royal Oak, $65,109
6. Mothering Justice, Royal Oak, $50,000
7. Michigan People’s Campaign, $50,000
8. Restaurant Opportunities Center Action, $2,389

 

 

 

 

Small Business For A Better Michigan (Anti-Earned Sick Leave)

Campaign disclosures cover: Through Nov. 26, 2018

What it is: This was a campaign that worked to oppose the ballot proposal to insttitute earned sick leave requirements in Michigan. The Legislature approved the proposal and later amended the language to weaken the proposal's provisions.

How much has it raised: $215,209 ($181,000 direct contributions and $34,209 in-kind contributions)

How much has it spent: $155,589

How many individual contributions has it reported: about 30 contributions

Top contributors:

1. Michigan Manufacturers Association, Lansing,$71,555
2. Michigan Restaurant Association, Lansing, $28,000
3. Small Business Association of Michigan PAC II, Lansing, $25,000
4. National Federation of Independent Business, Tennessee, $24,518
5. Michigan Retailers Association, $13,000
6. Small Business Association of Michigan, Lansing, $10,635
7. Michigan Bankers Association, Lansing, $10,000
8. Michigan Chamber PAC II, $10,000
9. Michigan Farm Bureau, $10,000

 

 

 

 


Protecting Michigan Taxpayers (Pro-Prevailing Wage Repeal)

Campaign disclosures cover: Through Oct. 20, 2018

What it is: This was a proposal campaign to initiate legislation to repeal Michigan's prevailing wage law, which sets wage standards for certain publicly-funded construction projects. The standards are based on other collectively bargained wages in the area. The Legislature approved the prevailing wage repeal proposal in June, ending the campaign.

How much has it raised: $1.70 million ($1.65 million direct contributions and $45,633 in-kind contributions)

How much has it spent: $1.64 million

How many individual contributions has it reported: 27 contributions

Top contributors:

1. Associated Builders and Contractors of Michigan, Lansing, $1.41 million
2. Silver Bullet Group Inc., Las Vegas, $150,025
3. Construction Legal Rights Foundation, Washington D.C., $75,000
4. September Group LLC, Wyoming, $50,000
5. Americans for Prosperity Michigan, Lansing, $18,117 (donated staff time)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Protect Michigan Jobs (Anti-Prevailing Wage Repeal)

Campaign disclosures cover: Through Dec. 31, 2018

What it is: This was a ballot committee that opposes repealing Michigan's prevailing wage. It has opposed Protecting Michigan Taxpayers' proposal. The Legislature approved the prevailing wage repeal proposal in June, ending the campaign.

How much has it raised: $1.19 million ($932,212 direct contributions, $258,033 in in-kind contributions)

How much has it spent: $987,201

How many individual contributions has it reported: 117 contributions

Top contributors:

1. Michigan Building and Construction Trades, Detroit, $393,700
2. National Electrical Contractors Association, Michigan chapter, $143,304
3. Michigan Pipe Trade Association PAC, Flushing, $75,000
5. Mid Michigan Electrical Alliance, Lansing, $73,400
4. Michigan Laborers District Council, Lansing, $63,506
6. International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 58, $40,000
7. Associated General Contractors, Lansing, $39,656
8. Plumbers Local 190, Ann Arbor, $30,000
9. L/M National Electrical Contractors Association L/U 8, $30,000
10. Operating Engineers Local 324, $26,000

 

 


 

 

Clean Energy, Healthy Michigan (Pro-Increased Renewable Energy Standard)

Campaign disclosures cover: Through Oct. 12, 2018

What it is: This was a proposal campaign to incrementally increase the renewable energy standard for electric providers to 30 percent by 2030. The standard is currently set to increase to 15 percent by 2021. The committee dissolved in October 2018 after reaching a deal with Michigan's dominant electric utilities.

How much has it raised: $4.51 million ($4.22 million direct contributions and $292,869 in in-kind contributions)

How much has it spent: $4.22 million

How many individual contributions has it reported: about 20 contributions

Top contributors:

1. NextGen Climate Action, San Francisco, $4.28 million
2. NextGen America, San Francisco, $204,698

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Clean MI (Pro-Part-Time Legislature)

Campaign disclosures cover: Through Oct. 20, 2018

What it is: This was a proposal campaign to amend the Michigan Constitution to require a part-time Legislature. Under the proposal, the Legislature must complete its work by April 15 of each year. This proposal failed to gather enough signatures to advance.

How much has it raised: $1.70 million ($1.33 million in direct contributions and $377,173 in in-kind)

How much has it spent: $1.32 million

How many individual contributions has it reported: 889 contributions

Top contributors:

1. Fund for Michigan Jobs, nonprofit, Lansing, $1.05 million
2. MI PAC, in-kind advertisements, $301,224
3. Capital Sales Company, Hazel Park, $100,000
4. William Parfet, Hickory Corners, $100,000
5. Direct Mailers Integration, Grand Rapids, in-kind, $37,497
6. Hard Data LLC, Grand Rapids, $36,000
7. Victory Phones, Grand Rapids, in-kind, $35,648
8. Harold Blumenstein, Paragon Properties Company, Bingham Farms, $5,000
9. Roco Real Estate, Bloomfield Hills, $4,000
10. Vertical Strategies, Grand Rapids, in-kind $2,600